Monthly Archives: June 2017

Capelin Newfoundland

The capelin or caplin is one of my favorite fish to eat. For me, there is no better meal then a pan fry of freshly caught capelin fried in butter. A few days ago one of my cousins posted a photo, from a town on in Placentia Bay, of capelin rolling on the beach. Hopefully, they will arrive in Conception Bay soon.

The capelin finally came in on the beach in Lance Cove on Wed morning July 25th.My son texted me at 8:00am and said that they were rolling on the beach. I picked up one of my grandsons and we drove up to Seal Cove, Surprising, there were only a few people on the beach. One was a friend of ours, Wayne and he had a dip net. We were able to get some which we gave away  to family and friends.

The fish were smaller than what we were used to catching.

Below are a few photos.

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Catching, cleaning and baking capelin


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As mentioned, my favorite way to cook capelin is to pan fry them in butter. When my sister Diane was alive I would go to her house for a meal of freshly fried fish. They were a gourmet meal. For some reason I could not cook them like my sister. It may have been the pan that she used. I could eat at least a dozen..

When I was a child and living in Creston, my father would row the dory down to Mooring Cove or Spanish Room for a load of capelin. We would corn some but most would be used as a fertilizer in our vegetable garden.

Highway Driving Newfoundland Labrador

I have been a licensed driver for over fifty years and have never taken a refresher course. Recently there have been many new traffic lights installed here in Conception Bay South and many drivers appear to be confused with the highway regulations.

I live on a side street that has new traffic lights. As of this post the lights are flashing amber on the main highway and red on the side street. The following directions or regulations are copied from The newfoundland Labrador Highway Driving website.

Flashing Light Traffic Signals. … A flashing red signal means come to a complete stop and proceed only when it is safe. A flashing amber signal means to slow down and proceed with caution.

TRAFFIC LIGHT SIGNALS A solid green light at an intersection means you may go straight ahead or turn right. If you want to make a left turn, you can proceed only after yielding right-of-way to pedestrians and oncoming traffic (motorists coming toward you through the intersection). A solid amber light means that the red signal is about to appear. You must stop your vehicle if you can do so safely; otherwise proceed through the intersection with caution. A solid red light means you must stop at the intersection and wait for the signal to turn green before proceeding. You may make a right turn providing you come to a complete stop and yield right-of-way to pedestrians and other traffic before proceeding (unless a sign prohibits you from doing so). A green signal with a green arrow means you may proceed in the direction of the arrow, straight ahead, or turn right unless a sign prohibits you from making such a turn. When the arrow signal goes off, follow the rule for a solid green light. A red signal with a green arrow means you may proceed only in the direction of the arrow, after yielding right-of-way to pedestrians and other traffic. When the arrow signal goes off, you must wait for the solid green light to appear before proceeding. A flashing amber signal means to slow down and proceed with caution. A flashing red signal means come to a complete stop and proceed only when it is safe. At some intersections, signs may prohibit a RIGHT turn. There may be occasions when, because of a collision or traffic congestion, a police officer may motion you to go through a red light. In such cases always obey the directions of the police officer.

Drive safely and watch out for falling rocks.

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